Bullseye partially open-sourced – have a look!

Since we introduced Bullseye, a Hybris-as-a-Service (YaaS) based prototype around in-store customer engagement & commerce, the first time at the Hybris Summit ’16 in Munich, we’ve been showing and replicating it across the globe like crazy. We’ve even had companies like BASF do public trials in their stores and just as I write these sentences, we’ve signed up showrooms in Singapore and Thailand. It’s a truly global prototype, highly flexible in terms of the configuration and running on our beloved YaaS infrastructure in the cloud.

While the software-parts of this prototype (below is an architecture to help you remember) are easy to scale, we’ve had quite some challenges to scale the hardware. Our platforms – containing a small microcontroller, a light sensor and a LED ring – are hand-made, hand-soldered, each with a 3D-printed case which alone takes about 4 hours to print in a decent quality. We’ve created many of these platforms ourselves, spending days and weeks making new platforms for new prototype installations somewhere on this globe.

candy-shop-90x60While we’ve been successful in finding a local electronics engineering company that produced these platforms for several projects already, the platforms still needed to come to our desks to be flashed with the correct firmware and initialized. We’ve so far not been able to outsource these parts, as there’s software involved that we could not easily just hand over to them.

That’s changed now! We’ve successfully¬† open-sourced all the hardware-facing parts of ourBullseye prototype: take a look at the plat GitHub page! This will greatly facilitate the production of platforms in the future, as the hardware & software of the platforms is now completely available for others. It would also be cool to see variations – we’ve used a light sensor and an LED ring in our platform, but you could easily swap that for other sensors and actuators!

In the end, our new open source project is a great blueprint for connected devices. It will not fit for all use cases of course, but I could well imagine that it works for a lot ideas that people have. Here are a few ideas what you can do/learn with this project:

  • Figure out how we reliably connect a Raspberry PIs to the cloud via MQTT and node.js, upon booting the device
  • Figure out how to send data from the Raspberry PI to connected/wired platforms via USB, potentially with USB hubs in between to scale the number of platforms connected
  • Figure out how to write a serial protocol to collect events from the platforms¬†or send commands to them

Have a look, clone the repo, try it out! After all: Have Fun!

 

That would make it one on each continent…

…Smart Wine Shelves, that is. It looks like the guys from SAP South Africa are planning to build one. Well, since the Smart Wine Shelf will no longer be supported by the end of this year, it’ll be Bullseye in the wine shelf version. But that count’s!

“‘The benefits for both retailers and consumers are enormous,'” commented Brett Parker, Managing Director, SAP Africa. “‘With so much online competition, in-store experiences now need to be fun and engaging. Not only do concepts such as SAP’s Smart Wine Shelf provide for this, upping the customer experience and ultimately customer satisfaction, but smart technology also provides the retailer with access to valuable analytics.'”

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