Hybris Labs in 2016 – The Year of IoT

Parallel to the SAP Hybris Digital Summit  2017 we want to take a look at the past year through the eyes of Hybris Labs. We decided to name our 2016 “The Year of IoT”. The very first Labs IoT prototype does of course date back to 2014 and came in the shape of the original Smart Wine Shelf. But what we like to refer to as the “mastery of IoT” involves achievements such as the replication and adaptation of our prototypes, enabled through YaaS, the distribution of our demos to events across the globe, and the very first Hybris Labs prototype with an SAP Hybris customer. Continue reading

Project X-Ray

Two of our Hybris Labs prototypes need a tag-to-YaaS mapping. Infinite Cart  uses NFC (Near field communication) where the Tag ID is mapped as product code (SKU number). For the Changing Room prototype we are using RFID (Radio-frequency identification) tags. When we started with this prototype you had to hold a RFID tag near an RFID scanner and then had to check the log files to find its ID.

With the RFID Action Reader, which we’re also using for our Expose prototype, you can read the RFID ID on a Raspberry Pi. But I also built a custom made Arduino Shield with an Indy RS500 chip (from Impinj), which sends the the RFID value via USB port. This made life much easier and gave me the idea for Project X-Ray. Continue reading

General Update & Final Architecture Diagram for Expose

It’s been a while since I wrote about expose, but finally I am sitting at the Munich airport again, which is my favorite time to write blog posts. From a technical point of view, expose is in the final phase of being polished. We’ve worked with the designers at SNK to create great user interfaces, ironed out a few bugs here and there and are currently thinking of two showrooms (Munich and New York) to install this prototype. While these discussions and the details will need a few more weeks, I think technically this prototype is locked-down and done. So it’s time to take a final look at it and wrap it all up. Continue reading

Bullseye-Mania in South America

Even though a Bullseye-Tour of South America does sound quite appealing,  we saw more sense in enabling our colleagues to build, configure, set up, and conduct the demo themselves. So while Georg and Nick were in Mexico City they took the opportunity to share some Bullseye and also Infinite Cart expertise. There was only one minor drawback. The main component of the Bullseye platforms, a microcontroller called “Teensy-LC USB Board”, is a slightly exotic piece of equipment and therefore not easily purchasable in all countries. Our Colombian colleagues were faced with exactly this problem. Them being under some time pressure, we decided to try our luck in the electronic stores of downtown Mexico City. Continue reading