IoT with Arduino Yun and YaaS

Arduino Yun IoT

The Arduino Yun hooked up to an LDR light sensor

Inspired by Georg’s post about connecting the ESP8266 to the upcoming hybris as a Service (YaaS), I thought it would be great to connect an Arduino microcontroller to the YaaS platform to showcase an Internet of Things (IoT) scenario. To keep this proof of concept (PoC) small, I decided that fetching an OAuth2 token and posting a sensor value to the YaaS Document Repository would be a good start.

The Arduino however does not have any out of the box capability to send data to the Cloud. There are many modules (or shields) which are able to connect the Arduino to the Internet, including Ethernet, WIFI or using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) through a gateway. Due to the Arduino computing and memory constraints, almost all of those connection options cannot levarage security layers such as HTTPS or TLS. The hybris YaaS platform though requires data to be sent using HTTPS which does not leave a lot of options for secure IoT with the Arduino.

While looking into different options I saw that we had an Arduino Yun lying around in the office and so I decided to use it for the PoC. The Arduino Yun is a hybrid microcontroller board which includes a full-blown Linux System-on-a-Chip (SoC) as well as the same AVR chip found on an Arduino Leonardo. The Arduino IDE includes a Bridge library which lets the Arduino microcontroller talk to the Linux SoC over a USART serial connection.

Instead of implementing an Ethernet and/or WIFI driver plus TCP/IP and HTTP for the limited AVR microcontroller, the Arduino team created a lightweight wrapper for the CURL command line HTTP client which is called over a serial bridge on the Linux SoC.

Unfortunately, this library currently implements HTTP and not its secure variant HTTPS nor sending POST requests. In order to make web service calls to YaaS, I had to implement my own little wrapper around CURL for fetching YaaS tokens and for sending secure POST requests to the YaaS Document Repository.

The sensor that I am using is an LDR (Light Dependent Resistor) which is connected to the Arduino’s Analog-Digital-Converter (ADC) port A0 using a voltage divider circuit. The circuit was set up on a breadboard and connected to the Arduino Yun.

arduino_ide_screenshot

YaaS client library in the Arduino IDE

I am using the Arduino String library to construct the JSON strings for the HTTPS request bodies. The Arduino Yun YaaS library I created only implements the following features: requestToken(), securePostRequest() and a super simple jsonStringLookup() to parse the token from the JSON response. Packing this functionality into 32kb of program memory and 2kb or RAM of an Arduino was a real challenge. When running out of RAM on the microcontroller, things will just stop working without any warning. The Arduino IDE only offers serial messages for debugging.

arduino_serial_screenshot

Successfully requested OAuth2 token and uploaded a sensor value to the YaaS document repository

In the process of writing the YaaS HTTPS library, I realized that doing requests by wrapping CURL requests does not provide a great level of flexibility when it comes to error handling and retries of requests. There are also some drawbacks to having a Linux SoC on the same microcontroller board: the difficulty of battery operation due to its power requirements or keeping a full-blown Linux system maintained and secure over time.

With my Arduino Yun PoC I have proven that it is possible to connect an Arduino to our new microservices based cloud platform YaaS. I learned that doing HTTPS requests on an 8-bit microcontroller is only feasible if you are using a more powerful gateway such as the Linux SoC included in the Arduino Yun. As a next step, it would be great to be able visualize the sensor data which I am pushing to the document repository. That’s a story for another blog post though.

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